Pyay

pyay01The ancient capital Pyu is home to the Thiri Kettaya ruins that date back to the 8th centruy. However, the ancient capital was destroyed by King Anawratha from Bagan during a conquest in 11th century. Pyay is located about 180 miles to the east of Yangon on the bank of the Ayeyarwady River. The region is rich in its historical importance and archaeological sites. Pyay also is an important commercial center for trade between the Ayeyarwady Delta and upper Myanmar. Several trains run daily from Yangon to Pyay, and have been running since 1877.

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The ancient city of Thayeikhittaya or Sriketra is approximately 8 km away from Pyay. The place was believed to be founded shortly after the great Buddhist Council that was held in 443 BC. The remains of the city span 19 square km today and several ruins are still hidden behind thickets of thorny bushes.

Sriketra used to be the largest, most elaborate city built by Pyu people, and it was the capital of the Pyu from the 5th to the 15th Century. Excavation work is being carried out at Beikthano near present day Beikthano to verify the site of the previous capital. The Pyay museum contains plenty of other objects such as Buddha images, clay votive tablets, bronze figures of musicians and dancers, some old coins, and artwork rendered in stone and various other materials.

Ahkauktaung

images/pyay03.jpgAhkauktaung, meaning "custom post" was discovered on the western bank of Ayeyarwady River a few years ago. It is Famous for having numerous Bhddha statues of different sizes and postures, carved on the rocky bank of the river. Ahkauktaung is a perfect day trip from Pyay, and on the way back, visitors may stop over at Myoma village where traditional handloom weaving process can be observed.